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Sam's tip of the week
01-23-2013, 06:21 AM
Post: #11
RE: Sam's tip of the week
Nope a backdraft (backdraught) in the UK is something entirely different. Ive taken a small break in the tips of the week but should be back up and running with it next monday, maybe ill start with backdraughts

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02-04-2013, 08:38 AM
Post: #12
RE: Sam's tip of the week
*** Week 7 ***

Fire science.

Over the coming weeks I will concentrate on fire science, explaining; flash overs, backdraughts, fire gas explosions, auto ignition temperatures, fire triangle, neutral plane, door procedure, ventilation pros and cons

Fire Science lesson one

The attached file is a diagram of the Fire Triangle
All points of the triangle have to be present for combustion to occur.

HEAT = A rather obvious one, without heat a fire fire will die out

OXYGEN = Combustion requires oxygen to continue the chemical reaction this is what the fire breathes

FUEL = What is actually burning, i.e foam in a chair, coal on a BBQ if the fuel runs out the fire burns out

If you take any of these away from the fire and combustion will cease.

PASSIVES = Passives are different as they are not essential to combustion but if introduced they directly influence the rate at which a fire grows. Passives are objects surrounding the fire that absorb heat from the fire, I.e Walls, Furniture etc. these objects absorb the radiated heat from the fire until a point where they can no longer absorb any heat. At this point they start to radiate heat back towards the fire which then makes the fire grow rapidly


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Sam1454

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02-11-2013, 03:15 PM
Post: #13
RE: Sam's tip of the week
*** Week 8 ***

Fire Science Lesson 2

Pyrolysis

Pyrolysis is the decomposition of a organic substance when introduced to fire or heat. As a substance, for example wood, comes into contact with an extreme heat source I.e naked flame the atoms begin to break down releasing Hydrogen (H2), Methane (CH4) and Tar. As these chemicals are released as gasses they leave behind Char. It is the gasses that are released from these materials that help create the conditions for flashovers, backdraughts and fire gas explosions to occur. Note that the Gasses released from substances are Flammable. As the substance catches alight it is not the wood that is on fire but the gasses that are being released from Pyrolosis. No matter what the material is that is burning, the uninterrupted flame does not actually touch the surface but a millimeter or so above the surface.

To see this for yourself, light a match in a safe environment over a kitchen sink, and observe the way the flame sits on top of the match but not actually touching it. If you are going to attempt this seek adult supervision and make sure you have means of extinguishing the match once the experiment is complete.

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02-18-2013, 07:22 PM
Post: #14
RE: Sam's tip of the week
*** Week 9 ***

Auto ignition temperatures

Auto ignition temperatures are a lesser known occurrence but can be one of the most dangerous. What it is, is the ignition of a material without direct surface contact with a flame. As a material is subjected to radiated heat from a heat source I.e a naked flame it starts to increase in temperature, as this temperature rises it starts to Pyrolise - release gasses (see week 8) as the Pyrolosis continues and the temperature rises further, the material reaches a critical point where it will self ignite without physical contact with flames.

You can see this on YouTube videos with high powered lazers, the policeman in the Bradford city football fire video.

If you want to test this for yourself in a safe environment. Light a tea light, then hold a match stick with a pair of pliers whilst wearing oven gloves. Hold the match stick over the lit candle without making physical contact with the flame. Watch the Pyrolosis start to occur as the heat builds, it should suddenly ignite a short while after. This is the auto ignition temperature.

Where this commonly occurs is in cooking when boiling vegetable oil. If left unattended it can auto ignite without touching any flame

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02-25-2013, 05:49 PM
Post: #15
RE: Sam's tip of the week
*** Week 10 ***

When working on a fire station it is important to be at the top of your game at all times. A good way to help achieve this is to make sure that if you are hydrated, fed and to have an empty bladder. There is nothing worse than being inside a fire whilst Thirsty, Hungary and needing the toilet

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03-04-2013, 03:29 PM (This post was last modified: 03-04-2013 03:30 PM by sam1454.)
Post: #16
RE: Sam's tip of the week
***Week 11***

When arriving at a fire the most important questions to ask the resident or owner of the property are,

Where in the building is the fire?
What is on fire?
Is there anybody in there?
Is there anything in the property that poses a danger to the firefighters? I.e gas cylinders, Dogs, holes in the floor etc

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03-25-2013, 05:11 AM
Post: #17
RE: Sam's tip of the week
*** Week 12 ***

A personal item of equipment I would advice firefighters to carry with them in their turnout gear or on their person is a good quality multitool, I have used mine every single day for multiple uses. They are an absolutely invaluable tool. Stay away from cheaper brands as they will break within the first year. Try a mid range Leatherman or Gerber and you will be sorted for your career with the 25 year or lifetime warranty respectively.

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06-13-2013, 10:56 AM (This post was last modified: 06-13-2013 10:56 AM by Zacw1994.)
Post: #18
RE: Sam's tip of the week
(03-25-2013 05:11 AM)sam1454 Wrote:  *** Week 12 ***

A personal item of equipment I would advice firefighters to carry with them in their turnout gear or on their person is a good quality multitool, I have used mine every single day for multiple uses. They are an absolutely invaluable tool. Stay away from cheaper brands as they will break within the first year. Try a mid range Leatherman or Gerber and you will be sorted for your career with the 25 year or lifetime warranty respectively.

Also some door chocks so the door doesn't lock behind you. their cheap insurance
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06-13-2013, 05:24 PM
Post: #19
RE: Sam's tip of the week
It's good fireman ship to check behind a door as you go through it, for casualties and to make sure there are door handles on both sides. In the UK we do not go anywhere inside a fire without a charged line of hose. That in turn acts as our door chock so I don't carry them. Different organisations have different firefighting tactics.

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06-21-2013, 12:04 PM (This post was last modified: 06-21-2013 12:05 PM by Zacw1994.)
Post: #20
RE: Sam's tip of the week
(06-13-2013 05:24 PM)sam1454 Wrote:  It's good fireman ship to check behind a door as you go through it, for casualties and to make sure there are door handles on both sides. In the UK we do not go anywhere inside a fire without a charged line of hose. That in turn acts as our door chock so I don't carry them. Different organisations have different firefighting tactics.

Many Fire Departments in the U.S use the same tactic except for high-rise fire's. If you're pulling a 1 3/4" hose down a hallway and go into a room to check it and then continue down the hallway you're going pull the hose out of the room. I just think door chocks are better for marking rooms searched in dark smoke conditions because you feel the door chocks vs. markers. but that's my opinion

a tip for high-rise firefighting: set hose up stairs before going to charge the line and going into the fire floor that way you have gravity on you side when you enter the floor. you never know what lies beyond the door.
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